Cottage Cheese Rolls

Cottage Cheese Rolls

Cottage Cheese Rolls
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
32 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
4 hours
Servings Prep Time
32 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
4 hours
Cottage Cheese Rolls
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
32 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
4 hours
Servings Prep Time
32 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
4 hours
Ingredients
Rolls
Servings: rolls
Instructions
Rolls
  1. In mixer put in margarine and mix.
  2. Add cottage cheese and mix.
  3. Add flour and mix until blended (this takes a large mixer or a heavy one).
  4. Place dough in bowl and cover, refrigerate overnight.
  5. Divide dough into 4 parts.
  6. Roll each part into an 8 or 9 inch circle (rolling only one way).
  7. Cut into 8 wedges and roll up like Crescent Rolls.
  8. Place on ungreased cookie sheet – be sure the tip is well sealed underneath.
  9. Bake at 370 for 20 minutes. Cool slightly.
Frosting
  1. Frost with a mixture of powdered sugar, milk and vanilla. Just drip it lightly across each roll. Dip in ground nuts.
Recipe Notes

Cottage Cheese Rolls Page 1 Cottage Cheese Rolls Page 2

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Sweet & Sour Sauce

Sweet & Sour Sauce

plated sweet and sour

Sweet & Sour Sauce
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Sweet & Sour Sauce
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Mince up the onion and pepper.
  2. In 2 qt sauce pan over medium heat, brown onion and green pepper in the salad oil.
  3. Stir in the pineapple juice, brown sugar, red wine vinegar, soy sauce and salt.
  4. Heat to boiling. Add the cornstarch mixed with water.
Recipe Notes

Sweet & Sour Sauce

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Swiss Chocolate Cake & Frosting

Swiss Chocolate Cake & Frosting

Swiss Chocolate Cake & Frosting
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
25 minutes 2 hours
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
25 minutes 2 hours
Swiss Chocolate Cake & Frosting
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
25 minutes 2 hours
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
25 minutes 2 hours
Ingredients
Cake
Frosting
Servings:
Instructions
Cake
  1. Preheat oven to 350 – 375 degrees F (175 – 200 degrees C).
  2. In larger bowl sift together flour, sugar, salt and soda.
  3. Bring the water, margarine and baking chocolate to a boil.
  4. Pour over the dry ingredients and mix well.
  5. Add eggs, vanilla and sour cream. Mix well.
  6. Put into a greased and floured 9×13 pan.
  7. Bake at 350 – 375 for 25 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool.
Frosting
  1. Bring the chocolate, milk and margarine to a boil.
  2. Take away from the heat and add sugar and flour.
  3. Return to heat and bring to a boil stirring constantly. DO NOT stir anymore. Test a drop of the syrup in cool water until it forms a soft ball (usually takes only 2 minutes or more). Cool thoroughly.
  4. Add vanilla.
  5. When stirring, if icing gets too thick, thin with milk a little at a time.
Recipe Notes

 

 

Swiss Chocolate Cake Recipe & Frosting Page 2Swiss Chocolate Cake Recipe & Frosting Page 1

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Hot Dog Bean Casserole

Hot Dog Bean Casserole

Hot Dog Bean Casserole
Print Recipe
Cook Time
1 hour 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 hour 15 minutes
Hot Dog Bean Casserole
Print Recipe
Cook Time
1 hour 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 hour 15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Stir together all ingredients in a 2 quart baking dish.
  3. Bake at 350 for 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  4. Serve hot.
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Chocolate Frosting

Chocolate Frosting

Chocolate Frosting
Print Recipe
Grandma Janette’s Chocolate Frosting Recipe.
Prep Time
10 minutes
Prep Time
10 minutes
Chocolate Frosting
Print Recipe
Grandma Janette’s Chocolate Frosting Recipe.
Prep Time
10 minutes
Prep Time
10 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients together.
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Solar Coop: Followup (One)

It has been a couple weeks since my father-in-law helped install the solar panels onto the chicken coop.  Since then, I have modified a few things, added this or that, or replaced a component or two.

The first thing to get replaced was the waterer (or fount).  The existing one we had was a carryover from the coop in Proctor; it was not keeping the water free of ice on the two days we have had that were below freezing in that last two weeks.  I picked up a new waterer/fountain (I bought the new one at Mills Fleet Farm for much less than what it is listed for on Amazon.com) – this one has a built in thermostatic switch that turns the heating element on at 35° F.

Looking at the reviews on this particular fountain, many of the complaints revolve around how the unit is filled.  There is a rubber plug on the underside that can be removed or you can simply remove the entire base.  I can see where the complaints of having to “flip” the unit after filling are coming from, but this style of waterer is all we have ever used.  I went with this model because it was the lowest watt-use fountain (100 watts) that I could find, and it could be hung.  All of the metal waterers that I have come across use a heated metal base.  I could imagine, with this setup, having ice-free water, but having all sorts of debris in the water from the chickens kicking bedding around in the coop.  In addition to the new waterer, I added in an electric timer.  This is a bit of an experiment, but my thinking is that water, when surface area is minimized, is a relatively good retainer of heat.  If the heated-waterer is adding heat to the water now and again – when the temperature is below 35° F – it will use less of the battery reserve than if only relying upon the thermostatic controller in the waterer.  That is my thesis, at least.  It is difficult, however, to control variables in the experiment when things like the ambient temperature keep going well above freezing, or there is not enough sun to charge the battery.

About a week into the experiment of solar panels on the coop, I noticed the battery was not holding a charge for very long.  It was not a new battery, but, I thought it should have been lasting more than 24 hours with little to no draw on the battery.  The sun had hardly been seen over this time period, but the solar panel charge controller was registering enough charge from the panels to attempt to charge the battery.  I installed a ammeter/watt-hour-meter inline between the battery and the power inverter.  I wanted to see if there were phantom load being drawn.

DSC_6164 - 2014-12-24 at 11-50-50 - Version 2 - 2014-12-24 at 11-50-50With no real sign of phantom loads, I replaced the battery.  This will be a bit of an experiment, too.  A few of the solar-related forums and articles that I read through had recommendations on using AGM batteries, but the cost – usually two to three times more than a conventional lead-acid battery – is a bit much for me at this point.

That last bit of modifications that I have made were to solar panel mounts.  I raised the panels to a steeper angle.  In my travels around the Twin Cities metro-area, I kept an eye out for solar panels on MNDOT equipment (traffic cameras and information signage, for example) that is located on roadsides and in ditches.  The angle that is used on much of their equipment looks to be around 40° to 45°.  I raised the height by about 8″ or up to an angle of about 40°.

I think all we really need now is freezing weather and some sunny skies.

DSC_6165 - 2014-12-24 at 11-59-06 - Version 2 - 2014-12-24 at 11-59-06

One-Hundred-One

27dfef23e0afe257cf87ddf274ea77a9f0990ad2e9e1cdb72e9799773ac2c86f_fullOn December 23, 1913, my grandfather, Charlie, was born.  He would be 101 years old.  He passed away in June of 1998.

Aside from it being near his birthday and near to Christmas, I have been thinking of him lately.  The odd weather here in St. Paul – it’s close to Christmas, and we do not have any snow left on the ground.

I have been mentally rolling around his adages,  axioms and stories.  Some of those bits of wisdom are from a time when language was more direct and less politically correct.  The one story that is curious, is that of his tale of getting a pair of skis for his birthday + Christmas.

Looking back on this story, I seem to remember it having two different endings.   The story usually came up in the context of my sister and I getting too many presents.

He would explain that his birthday would always get combined into Christmas, and he would only get one present.  The pair of skis-as-a-gift would come up and then, depending upon his desired affect, the ending would be different.  He would always go into the detail of sneaking into his mother’s closet to snoop on the gifts; he found a pair of skis with his name on them.  The story always mentioned one key point: even though it was late December, in northern Minnesota, there was no snow on the ground.

At this point, some times, when trying to emphasis that it was a lot harder back-in-the-day, Christmas would arrive, and there continued to be no snow on the ground.  Disappointed, he had wait and be patient; snow would eventually fall.  The lesson being that you sometimes have been patient.

d436b59621ae21f28b7ddf0f672c78b43489694d69ceb0317288c122e43fd860_fullAt other times, during the telling of the story, the ending would be more upbeat and downright more like the holiday episode of a sitcom: Christmas would arrive, and it had snowed early in the morning.  He was able to use the skis.

Happy Birthday, Charlie.