A Brief Summary of South Florida

Those individuals within my immediate circle of friends and family know of and are aware of a career move I made in mid-February. After finishing a masters degree in computer science at the end of 2017, I caught my breath, stepped back and took a moment to reflect on where I was at professionally. Over the course of 2018, I ruminated on whether now was the time to continue the academic push together further graduate studies in computer science, or if I should make a change with my career’s direction.

Ruling out doctoral studies, I started to look for open positions in the Twin Cities’ area, as well as entertaining discussions with technical recruiters.

After many interviewers, phone calls, and all the machinations involved, I received an offer for employment from the analytics wing of a large, publicly traded, renewable energy focused, electricity company. I accepted the offer.

And so, five weeks into my latest career move, I found myself in South Florida, visiting the corporate headquarters, and meetings coworkers who I had only seen and interacted with via video conferencing.

Jupiter Beach Resort & Hotel

As I told a few coworkers, I had never been to Florida. If you are a long term lurker of my musings on this blog, you will be aware of my global meanderings, but I had never been to Florida. The farthest south in the continental United States was South Carolina, and even then, I have only been to Lancaster, which is near the border with North Carolina.

When I arrived in West Palm Beach, Florida, the sun had not gone down, yet, and the weather was pleasant – in the mid-60s, light breeze, and more humidity than back home.

My preconceived notion was Florida entirely built from media accounts of events that I had taken notice of over the years, as well as a narrow thread of inputs from former coworkers who had, at one in their lives, live in South Florida. Publix grocery stores, garish cars & culture, Cuban sandwiches, stand your ground laws, and truck nuts were all things that I have associated with a Florida writ large.

Two hours north of Miami, along the coast, I found low key communities, snowbirds winding down their winter stays — looking forward to returning homes in states north, and open air restaurants. One of the most interesting things I found was architecture. It had a similar incorporation of outdoor and indoor spaces that made me think of the similar use of indoor and outdoors that is found in the Presidential Palace in Ho Chi Minh City. I encountered a few covered walkways here and there. There is no snow, but there is plenty of rain. Likewise, the majority of the street light poles and power poles were concrete, reminding me of Japan. Similar to Japan, Florida has to deal with massive storms with high winds.

Jupiter Beach

I’m certain that my three days in South Florida does not represent a meaningful sample of the place and people, but it was a pleasant place, with friendly people. There were Publix grocery stores, and I did shop at one. There were fancy cars, but the truck nuts must have been hidden.